Month: June 2017

Low Carb Chocolate Pudding

Low Carb Chocolate Pudding

This delicious recipe is a real food, keto-friendly substitute to the chemical filled boxed chocolate pudding that you can buy at the store.

Low Carb Chocolate Pudding

Course Breakfast, Dessert, Snack
Cuisine chocolate
Prep Time 3 minutes
Cook Time 2 minutes
Total Time 5 minutes
Servings 2
Author Kristy

Ingredients

  • 3 Avocados
  • 1/2 Cup Almond milk Or other milk
  • 1/4 Cup Heavy whipping cream
  • Dash Of Salt
  • 1/4 Tsp Vanilla
  • 2 Tbsp Cocoa powder
  • 2 Tbsp Stevia Or other sweetener to taste

Instructions

  1. Cut, pit, and scoop avocados. 

  2. Combine everything in a blender and blend until smooth.

  3. Taste test. Once you have a combination that you like, you're done!

Father’s Day Print Cards

Father’s Day Print Cards

We have another round of holiday cards to paint for some super special people today–dads!

I decided to go with a western theme this year with my girls helping.

Supplies:

8 1/2 × 11 cardstock cut in half

Tempera paint–brown, green, and tan

Acrylic paint–yellow and pink

A paintbrush

Red and blue or black construction paper

Glue

A ballpoint pen or black marker

 

Steps:

1. Have a little helper place two brown footprints (one of each foot) on the inside of the card. These are chaps! You can see in the pictures that mine are too high up and too big, my 6 month old is a giant! You could size your paper up if you would like, I just have small envelopes. I also had her put a small handprint for a little cactus. Let dry.

2. Have a helper (I had my 20 month old do this) add a large green handprints to the front of the card. This is a prickly pear cactus. Let dry.

3. On the inside, glue a triangle of blue or black construction paper down between the chaps for a body. I used patterned paper. Paint a head with tan paint and let the glue and paint dry.

4. Add some cactus needles and arms to your little cowboy man. I also added a foam cowboy hat sticker (he is tipping his hat, otherwise it would be hanging off).

5. It’s coming together! Give your cowboy some stick figure arms and a smiling face with a pen. Cut a small triangle out of red construction paper and glue on top of the shirt around the neck.

6. Using pink acrylic paint (I used acrylic for the different texture and layering of the paint) and the wrong end of a paintbrush (handle side), place a few scattered dots on your cacti. Wipe the end of the brush off and, using yellow paint, surround the pink dot with yellow flower petals. Add whatever finishing touches you like, and you’re done!

 

Madi’s Birth

Madi’s Birth

Madi had me in pain for weeks before she was born. I was constantly feeling that weird uncertainty that comes with a transition between worlds. Unproductive contractions and aches persisted night and day, and we were sure that she would come at any moment. However, she was holed up in her little uterine fortress and didn’t want to come out. At 41 weeks I finally had my membranes stripped, and labor started that night. It probably started very slowly around 5 in the evening, and labor was extremely mellow. The contractions weren’t bad–nothing like the horrible back labor I experienced with her older sister–and I joked with my husband the entire time. I tried to just lay in bed holding Kari, knowing that soon she would not longer be an only child. I was so afraid that she would be angry and hurt. Maybe around 10:30 things got a little more serious, and an hour or so later I was getting in the bath when suddenly the contractions got closer together and I looked at Matt worried. “It’s been a while,” I said. “We should probably go.”

Every single bump on the road hurt horribly, and I told him, “don’t speed or anything, but I think we’re having a baby soon.” Once we got to the hospital, faithful birth partner Matt moved me into a wheelchair, set Kari in my lap, and wheeled me off. She giggled as he wheeled us in and I screamed through contractions. Once we were in the ER, however, she no longer thought that my screaming was funny. Her grandma removed her from the room as I started to push.

“Don’t push yet!” One naive, but well meaning nurse instructed.

“Why?”

“The doctor doesn’t have gloves on.”

“SHE CAN PUT THEM ON WHILE I PUSH!” I cackled. I’m not very nice when I’m in labor.

“We’re running an IV.”

“Why?”

“So that we can give you drugs.”

“No you’re not.”

“Sweetie, if you bleed you’ll need pitocin–”

“You can shove a needle in my leg like you did a year ago, I don’t need an IV.”

It was just my luck that we ended up there on the one night that there were no midwives available. Anyway, my grouchiness aside, things went alright. I pushed for a while, she came out, no bleeding or tearing. The doctor was great. Madi was 9 pounds 9 ounces! At first she was unresponsive, and I saw worry on my husband’s face. “What’s wrong?” I asked, totally exhausted and out of it.

“Uh, they’re just going to stimulate her…” He looked at me and back at her.

Then I hear them calling for NICU and can’t comprehend what is happening. I look over, see her unmoving, and just think, please don’t die before I get to meet you…and then she wailed. It was the best sound I ever heard in my whole life. Madi latched herself immediately and had no trouble nursing at all. She was big, beautiful and sweet with big gray eyes and a head full of dark hair. Because of her size they wanted to give her formula, which I not so kindly refused–it might have sounded like a rude, hazy “Nooooope, no formula.” When the nurse said but she needs to eat I continued, “she can nurse.” (Really, I’m not nice when I have to deal with what I perceive to be counterintuitive stupidity.) They insisted on testing her blood sugar via heel prick for 24 hours, which went just fine. No eye ointment or vaccines at birth.

Her older sister was brought into the room and was super excited until she saw Madi nursing, then she lost it. The first few days were hard, coddling my 14 month old baby girl while she processed the new addition to the family, and I must admit I cried a lot that first week. I was so happy to meet my new daughter, but so sad to see her older sister’s jealousy and so scared that she would always feel resentful and hurt. Within days, much to my delight, the jealousy waned and Kari began smothering her little sister with kisses and snuggles in the morning. She loves snuggling and kissing her sister! Sometimes she wants to be held too if she sees Madi being cuddled, but she’s a great big sister and I’m really happy that they have each other.

So now I spend my days cooking, changing diapers, nursing and singing silly songs to my daughters. Kari wobbles around the living room, stacking and activating every toy imaginable and Madi usually stays in my arms. We go on family hikes and adventures together when daddy is home. It’s great, tiring, extremely rewarding, and I wouldn’t trade it for the world.

And so that is how our family of four came to be.