Tag: food

Crockpot Pizza Stuff

Crockpot Pizza Stuff

I love pizza. But you know, gluten and carbs and stuff. Fathead pizza is a great substitute and it’s not like it’s super time consuming, but sometimes I want the comfort food with minimal work.

Queue the Crockpot! What a wonderful invention.

Ingredients:

1 onion

2 orange bell peppers

1 poblano pepper

2 cans diced tomatoes

1 can tomato paste

Garlic

Basil

Oregano

3 chopped yellow squash

1 pound Italian sausage

Mozzarella

Parsley

Red pepper flakes

Directions:

1. Cook sausage and set aside. Chop and dice all the vegetables and combine onion, peppers, tomatoes and tomato paste, and squash in crockpot. Cook on high for about 2 hours.

2. Add garlic, oregano, basil and parsley. Stir in cooked sausage. Sprinkle with mozzarella and stir in. Top with more mozzarella. Crack the lid to vent steam and cook 1-2 more hours.

3. Serve with red pepper flakes and parmesan.

Easy Whipped Cream

Easy Whipped Cream

Sometimes you need a quick and easy whipped cream recipe–whether it’s for a quick fatty snack, perfect pumpkin pie, or to top off a delicious keto frappuccino.

So here it is! This recipe is 4 ingredients and whips together in a magic bullet or similar blender so fast it’s unbelievable.

Ingredients:

1/2 cup heavy whipping cream

A sprinkle of cream of tartar

1/4 tsp vanilla

15-20 drops of stevia

Directions:

1. Combine ingredients in magic bullet or other blender and blend. With the bullet it takes about a minute (this can vary). Watch it, though. It will thicken to a nice, creamy consistency–you can sometimes hear it change when whipping, but you don’t want to blend it for so long that it separates.

2. Enjoy your whipped cream!

Low Carb Gummies

Low Carb Gummies

One thing that’s easy to miss when you go low carb or sugar free is candy. There’s something uniquely satisfying about biting into a chewy, soft gummy bear that doesn’t compare to much else.

The good news is that these treats are easy to make at home and can pack quite a nutritional punch! These are great treats to keep in your fridge for summer when you or the kids might want a quick sweet treat that is healthy.

 

Low Carb Gummies

Author Kristy

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup gelatin I like Great Lakes orange label
  • 1/4 tsp Himalayan salt
  • pinch cream of tartar
  • 20 drops liquid stevia
  • Flavoring I used Tazo passion tea and some lemon juice
  • 1 cup hot water
  • 1/2 cup cold water

Instructions

  1. Steep herbal tea in hot water. In a separate cup, pour gelatin, salt, and cream of tartar. Add cold water to gelatin mix and whisk with fork until evenly dissolved. The mixture should start to bloom, becoming a gooey mass. 

  2. Once your tea is steeped, remove the tea bags. Pour into the cup with gelatin mixture and whisk with fork. It will take a minute or two for it to dissolve. Add liquid stevia. Taste to make sure you like the flavor (otherwise you won’t want to eat them!)

  3. Place your silicone molds on a flat tray. Carefully fill your molds with a spoon or dropper. I filled six whole molds with mine, but the kids ate the gummy bears before I got a chance to take pictures. Once your molds are full, place them in the refrigerator. If you don’t have silicone molds, you can simply pour into a Tupperware or Pyrex dish and let set.

  4. Remove from the fridge and take out of the molds or, if you used a dish, cut into small squares. Store in the fridge in an airtight container for 1-2 weeks. 

I originally posted this on Instructables:

https://www.instructables.com/id/Low-Carb-Gummies/

Sugar Free Peanut Butter Cups

Sugar Free Peanut Butter Cups

When you cut down on sugar, it can be hard to give up the classic candies and snacks. Suddenly the convenience of grabbing a Snickers or bag of chips just isn’t appealing.

Luckily, making your own peanut butter cups is simple and fun!

Find it here

Sugar Free Peanut Butter Cups

Author Kristy

Ingredients

Chocolate

  • 1/2 cup butter You can sub butter for coconut oil or vice versa, but the coconut oil will be a little softer and melt faster than butter.
  • 1/4 cup coconut oil https://amzn.to/2JCDZCR
  • 2-4 tbsp heavy whipping cream
  • 1/4 tsp vanilla
  • 1/4 tsp sea salt or Himalayan salt
  • 20-30 drops liquid stevia
  • 1/4 cup cocoa powder
  • pinch cream of tartar

Peanut Butter Filling

  • 1/4 cup peanut butter no sugar added
  • 1/4 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 10-15 drops liquid stevia

Instructions

  1. In a microwave safe bowl combine butter and coconut oil. Microwave until melted. 

    Transfer to blender. Add cocoa powder, salt, liquid stevia, vanilla, and heavy cream and blend for a few seconds to incorporate ingredients. You should have a nice brown liquid. 

    Chocolate taste test time! If you don’t like it, tweak it to your liking.

  2. Line your muffin tin with the paper liners. Spoon a small amount of chocolate into the bottom of each paper and place in the fridge to set. Set the rest of the chocolate to the side.

  3. While the chocolate is setting we’re going to make the peanut butter filling. Rinse the blender out or wipe it out with a paper towel.

    In the blender, combine peanut butter, cream, and stevia. You can do this by hand with a fork as well, but the cream may not really become whipped. It will still taste wonderful.

    Do a peanut butter taste test. Adjust it to your tastes if you need to.

  4. Remove the chocolate from the fridge. It’s okay if it’s not completely set and is still slightly soft, but it should not be liquid. Using a spoon, scoop globs of peanut butter into the cups on top of the chocolate. Smooth out until flat. Repeat for all 12 of your cups.

    Pour remaining chocolate over the peanut butter. Place in fridge for 1-2 hours.

  5. Remove from paper and enjoy! Can be stored in an airtight container in the fridge for 1-2 weeks, although around here they rarely last that long.

Originally written as an Instructable: https://www.instructables.com/id/Sugar-Free-Peanut-Butter-Cups

Fathead Pizza in a Crockpot

Fathead Pizza in a Crockpot

Lots of us have noticed that going low carb, gluten free, or grain free is the next big thing, and for good reason! It’s both delicious and nutritious. Even if you don’t usually avoid grains, this pizza is something you should give a try.

The crust is super easy and fun to make and you can modify it to taste. I like red pepper flakes in mine, but my kids are too young to enjoy that right now. You can even do this with a regular wheat crust, it cooks the same.

Plus, who would have thought that you can make pizza, with or without grain, in a Crockpot?! It’s very convenient and keeps the house cooler than running the oven, which is especially important as summer approaches.

This pizza is not super low carb, since it does have a small amount of almond flour, coconut flour, and then whatever carbs are in your toppings, but it is vastly improved from the traditional variety. This is definitely not an everyday meal if you try to keep your carbs really low, but rather a periodic indulgence (although I must admit I’ve had some version of this every day for weeks at a time). If you only have a small Crockpot you can modify this to make a personal sized pizza by halving the ingredients.

 

Fathead Pizza in a Crockpot

Author Kristy

Ingredients

Crust

  • 6-8 tbsp almond flour
  • 2 tbsp coconut flour
  • 1/2 cup mozzarella cheese
  • 1/2 package cream cheese 4 ounces
  • 1 egg
  • Spices: garlic powder, onion powder, oregano, basil, black pepper, salt, red pepper flakes
  • 2 tbsp coconut oil for greasing crockpot

Sauce

  • 1 can tomato paste
  • spices garlic powder, onion powder, oregano, basil, black pepper, salt, red pepper flakes

Instructions

  1. Open your cream cheese package, slice it in half, and throw it in a mixing bowl. Add mozzarella cheese and microwave for about a minute or until mozzarella begins to melt. Mix the cheese with a fork.

  2. Add an egg. Continue to mix together with a fork. The consistency is a little odd until the egg starts to incorporate, just go with it.

    Add your spices. I like powders because they’re easy to add to the pizza dough at this stage. Mix them in with your fork.

  3. Add coconut flour and almond flour. Stir to incorporate. Dough should become a little drier, but still pretty moist and malleable.

  4. Lay out a piece of parchment paper and grease your slow cooker. Roll the dough into a ball with your hands, then lay it on the parchment paper. You might want to stretch it a little bit to fit the shape of your Crockpot.

  5. Lay another piece of parchment paper over the dough. Using a rolling pin, roll the dough out until it will fit the bottom of the slow cooker nicely. You should have a nice, thick, evenly distributed crust.

    Transfer the crust and parchment paper into the greased Crockpot. Cook on high for 1 hour.

  6. Empty tomato paste into a mixing bowl and combine spices to taste.

  7. Once the crust has cooked for an hour, remove it from the slow cooker. Moving it around may be easier if you use a tray or cookie sheet. The bottom of the crust should be turning golden.

  8.  Spread tomato sauce mixture across crust. Top with your preferred toppings. Here we used bell pepper, onion, mushrooms, mozzarella, pepperoni, and sausage. Slide pizza onto a cookie sheet or tray and transfer back into the slow cooker.

  9. Cook on high for 1 hour. Once it's done, take it out and enjoy! Be aware, fathead pizza is very dense and will fill you up quickly.

Originally written as an Instructable: https://www.instructables.com/id/Fathead-Pizza-in-a-Crockpot/

 

Chocolate Almond Squares

Chocolate Almond Squares

Hey, folks! I’ve been keeping healthy gummies and chocolates in stock for when the kids need a quick snack, but yesterday we ran out of our homemade peanut butter cups (recipe coming soon). I’ve been having a lot of fun experimenting with making a solid milk chocolate, so this was a lot of fun!

Chocolate Almond Squares

Course Dessert, Snack
Prep Time 5 minutes
Author Kristy

Ingredients

  • 2-4 Tbsp Cocoa powder
  • 1 Cup Salted butter 1 stick
  • 1/4 Cup Coconut oil
  • 1/4 Cup Erythritol
  • 1/4 Tsp Vanilla extract
  • 1/4 Tsp Cinnamon For extra flavor
  • 1 Tsp Moringa greens powder or collagen powder Optional, I just like packing it in for the kids
  • 1/4 Cup Raw Almonds Whole or crushed
  • 1/4 Cup Heavy whipping cream

Instructions

  1. With a mortar and pestle or rolling pin, crush the almonds into a coarse consistency.

  2. In a microwave safe bowl combine butter and coconut oil. Microwave for 15-30 seconds. If butter and oil are soft already you can skip this. We don't want melted, only softened, so watch it closely.

  3. Mash the two together with a fork. 

  4. Add cream and vanilla and mix.

  5. Add cocoa powder, greens powder, and erythritol. Stir the dry ingredientd in well. You should have a pretty, milk chocolate with a mousse-like consistency.

  6. For setting the chocolate, either line a container with parchment paper or use plastic or silicone, something that you can pop the chocolate out of easily. Mix the almonds into your chocolate or spread them on top afterwards.

  7. Using a spatula or spoon, spread the mixture evenly in your container or mold. Place in the fridge to set for 4-6 hours.

  8. Remove from refrigerator. Pull parchment paper out and, with a sharp knife, slice into squares.

  9. Store in refeigerator for up to a week.

Succulent Spring

Succulent Spring

It’s my first spring in Texas in years, and I am brimming with excitement just witnessing the bluebonnets and indian paintbrushes bursting with color.

I’m a firm believer in natural living–food, medicine, housekeeping, cosmetics, and whatnot. I also tend to follow an evolutionary-style diet consisting of meat, nuts and seeds, plants, eggs, and some dairy. I shouldn’t eat dairy, really: we know that it hinders weight loss, interferes with hormones, exacerbating hypothyroidism, and most adults can’t digest it properly. These are just the reasons why I personally sshouldn’t be eating it, but my tastebuds oftentimes win that battle.

I digress. One thing I really feel is important is being involved in growing or procuring your own food. When we can hunt and keep chickens we plan to (right now it’s just not possible). We have a few hanging baskets and boxes right now for our temporary setup.

But here’s some food for thought: what is more natural than the food already growing outside your door? The weeds that many people seek to eradicate can often be a wonderful and free food or medicine. Truth be told, this is the real reason that spring makes me feel so invigorated. What else can make you feel so primal as foraging the woods for food (perhaps hunting and fishing)? I’m going to share a few easy, basic foods that can be found right now. Quick disclaimer: never eat something that you cannot 100% identify, people make themselves incredibly sick or die doing this.

Dandelion

Dandelion in our front yard

Dandelion means “lion’s tooth” from the deeply toothed leaf structure it bears. They thrive in disturbed soil and cracks and crevices. The hairless, smooth leaves can be eaten raw or cooked, but are best before flowering occurs. Flower petals can be sprinkled in salads for color and flavor or be fried, steamed, or boiled. Some even use flowers to make a wild wine. The root can be used as any cooked root vegetable, and is sometimes roasted and ground up for use as a coffee subsitiute. There are no toxic look alikes.

Yucca Flower

Yucca without flowers

I love yucca flowers, they’re definitely one of my favorite wild foods. My favorite edible part is the flower petals, which are best picked when they first open. I love to throw them in anything that I’m stir-frying. The flavor can vary depending on the variety of yucca–I’ve eaten spicy, horseradish-like petals and mild, cauliflower-like petals. The unopened flower bud and the fruit of some varieties are supposed to be edible as well, but I have never tried this.

Wood Sorrel

Growing between rocks

Oh, wonderful, lemony oxalis. My 2 and a half year old calls this plant “lemon taste,” and it’s a fight to keep her away from it. The entire plant is edible and tastes like lemon. It is commonly mistakenly called clover. Wood sorrel has beautiful flowers that add great color to salads. One day I plan on using these as a topping for something like lemon cake, I think that would be delightful. Contain oxalic acid, so do not eat more than a few leaves at a time. The tubers can be used like carrots. Note the heart shaped leaves, which help identify this plant.

Dewberry

Dewberry leaves and flowers

It isn’t quite the season for these yet, but the vines and flowers are sprawling. Now is the right time to make a mental note of everywhere you see the beautiful white flowers so that you can go back for berries later! I grew up picking these off of vines in our field, taking them home to wash, and devouring all that I could.

They are like scrubby, lanky blackberries. They are ripe when they turn black, but can usually be found easily among red, unripe berries. Be careful for the thorns! They also sometimes tend to grow where poison oak or poison ivy like to grow as well. I do believe that you can probably make tea out of the leaves, but I have never tried.

Agarita

Agarita leaves

Another addition that isn’t quite ready for harvesting yet but I just had to include is the thorny-foliaged agarita bush. This unique plant protects it’s bounty with spiked leaves in bunches of three–anyone who has encountered one knows exactly what I’m talking about. The yellow blossoms exude an intoxicating sweet scent in the spring before turning into little green berries that ripen red. The ripe berries are edible, though I remember them being a bit tart (I haven’t had one in nearly 20 years, but I’m going all out this year). They supposedly make great wild jam. The wood and root of agarita contain a compound called berberine which is medicinal.

Knowing your environment and understanding everything that surrounds you is such a lost art. I want my children to understand where their food comes from–it doesn’t magically appear in a grocery store. Someone grows it, someone raises the chickens that lay those eggs, someone else slaughters the animal that we eat. Having a hand in growing and procuring your own sustenance is something that every human should be involved in. Anyway, I’m not going to preach any more, I just think that free, wild, nutritious food is something to be considered. If it does happen to interest you there are some great resources out there (I’ve included some below).


Mark Vorderbruggen, aka Merriweather, is one of the nicest guys I’ve talked to and really knows his stuff. Texas area: http://www.foragingtexas.com/?m=1

Green Deane is based in Florida but is knowledgable all around, and very famous because of it. Extremely thorough with his plant profiles: http://www.eattheweeds.com

Samuel Thayer, genius in the field: https://www.foragersharvest.com

Steve Brill was arrested for eating a dandelion in Central Park! I really love how well his website is laid out: https://www.wildmanstevebrill.com

Christopher Nyerges was featured on the first season of Doomsday Preppers (don’t hold it against him), which is how I heard of him. We took an acorn processing class with him when Karissa was young and he is great. Southern California area: http://www.christophernyerges.com/index.htm